Magic Choral Trick #92 Kazoos

Last fall my women’s chorus decided to rise to the challenge of recording a song for CBC’s Weekend Morning – on kazoos.

CBC even sent us the 40 or so kazoos.

After a few times through ‘With A Little Help From My Friends’, we recorded the song and sent it off. But we kept the kazoos – which have now been added to our arsenal of technical tools.

What makes this such an effective rhythmic synchronization tool is the fact that in order to ‘play’ the kazoo you need to use the sound ‘doo’ with quite an emphasis on the ‘d’. The kazoo itself is so loud that it’s obvious when people aren’t lining up rhythmically.

The other benefit to this is that both the ‘d’ and the ‘oo’, when sung this aggressively, bring the sound forward in the mouth.

Just for fun, try having the chorus sing a phrase, kazoo the same phrase, then sing it again. You should notice a brighter sound.

If for some reason it makes very little difference to your chorus, at least you’ll have had a few laughs. Guaranteed.

Advertisements

About janetkidd

I've been waving my arms in front of choirs now for more than 35 years - and these are descriptions of all the very best things I've learned. I direct a Women's Competitive Barbershop Chorus, a Men's Competitive Barbershop Chorus, a Med School choir, and for a few weeks each year - Big Choir (about 100 voices) - which performs at an annual fundraising concert. Hope at least some of these Choral Magic Tricks will be useful to you - and thanks for reading. Janet

Posted on February 21, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: