Magic Choral Trick #340 The Choreo Move Shouldn’t Upstage the Face

This seems to be such common sense – but I think most of us who use choreography mess up on this one from time to time.

Thanks to David McEachern from the Barbershop Harmony Society’s Toronto Northern Lights for this reminder at his coaching session last month.

Does the choreo move match the emotion of the phrase that it’s supposed to be enhancing?

He pointed out that even if the move is a great one, or a clever one, if it doesn’t match the amount of emotion that we’re seeing on all the faces, the move will be a distraction.

As an audience member, we get confused when we’re getting Ta Dah!!! from the jazz hands move, and mild appreciation from the faces.

It’s not believable. Like a bad Irish accent in a Hollywood movie, it just keeps getting in the way of the story. (Best example ever – Far and Away, starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman [their Irish accents are so, so bad])

Audiences love to be enthralled by the story or the message of the song – but as soon as there’s a technical mismatching – tuning, balance, blend, or a mismatched visual message, we get pulled out of the narrative.

People may praise the clever move – even if it upstages the faces – but they probably won’t leap to their feet screaming for more.

When everything is in synch emotionally it’s very satisfying for an audience.

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About janetkidd

I've been waving my arms in front of choirs now for more than 35 years - and these are descriptions of all the very best things I've learned. I direct a Women's Competitive Barbershop Chorus, a Men's Competitive Barbershop Chorus, a Med School choir, and for a few weeks each year - Big Choir (about 100 voices) - which performs at an annual fundraising concert. Hope at least some of these Choral Magic Tricks will be useful to you - and thanks for reading. Janet

Posted on June 28, 2015, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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